Wildflower

Advice Not Taken

How often do we get advice from someone and then promptly ignore it? I learned the results of not paying attention to advice the other day.

My wife and I decided to go to the mountains for a short hike since the weather was supposed to be very nice. I looked for some events that might be going on in the area we were going to hike in and saw an ad for a guided tour to see wildflowers in bloom at one of the State parks. We drove up to the park and discovered we had missed the start of the tour by about 45 minutes. We decided to just walk the trail without the guide since it was a marked trail that was about a two-hour walk through the woods and along a stream. After walking along the trail for about thirty minutes, we realized we had seen almost no wild flowers. There were a few tiny yellow flowers along the way and that was it. After an hour we still had only seen the tiny yellow flowers and a few small violets. The woods were full of fallen dead trees (probably caused by the drought we have been having for a few years) and the living trees had not budded out with new growth yet. We decided we might be a few weeks early for the wildflowers since it had been snowing the week before we were there.

About two-thirds of the way through our hike we reached the stream and as we got closer to it we saw quite a few taller yellow daisy like flowers and more violets along the way. We had enjoyed the walk and being outdoors but the hike to see wildflowers had been pretty much a bust. Here are a few of the shots I took along the stream.

Stream 1

Stream 1

Stream 2

Stream 2

Wildflower

Wildflower

We headed back to the car and when we got within ten minutes of the parking lot I decided to shut off my camera and put the lens cap back on it. I was thinking about some advice I had recently been given about not being in a hurry to turn off your camera and put it away because you never know what might pop up in front of you and you needed to be ready to shoot at any time.  Suddenly I heard a noise in the bushes next to the trail and looked to see what it might be. There on a fallen tree trunk about five feet from me was a very young squirrel looking straight at me and just sitting there in an open area. It looked like a perfect Kodak moment but I wasn’t ready for it. I slowly turned the camera on and lifted my camera as I started taking the lens cap off. The squirrel sat there and watched me until I got the lens cap off and then bolted for cover. I was very disappointed in missing the shot. Here is what I got instead.

Missed Opportunity

Missed Opportunity

If you look close you can see the squirrel running away in the center of the shot. Needless to say , I plan on paying more attention to the piece of advice I got so that I don’t miss any opportunities in the future.

Have a great week! Until next time –

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This entry was published on April 7, 2013 at 10:57 pm. It’s filed under Macro, Nature, Photography and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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